Corporate Wellness


Have you and your team hit the wall and are suffering from Pandemic burnout? Join nationally recognized psychologists and specialists to give you strategies to re-energize, find better balance and take care of yourself.


On the Stage 

Cloud Conventions 2021
 May 12-14

View the On Demand Session Recordings

Navigate the "Next Normal"

Session Preview

How to Bring the Balance Back

How do we bring the balance back to our new work/life environment? Join the conversation as we explore strategies that we want to adopt in 2021 and beyond.

Creating deeper connections with your team

Do we really know how to stay “connected” even if your team and customers are still virtual? Unlock the secrets to staying connected no matter where you work from.

Do you have the resilience to navigate the long term?
If your resilience is fading and you’ve struggled to maintain your composure and balance for the long-haul, this is a must-attend session for you.

View the On Demand Session Recordings >>

Network & Connect

Meet the Experts

Speakers and panelists joined the Meet the Expert lounges, available after sessions for attendees to take a deeper dive and join the conversation.

The Networking Lounge

The Cloud Coffee Corner opened each morning and the day ended with a casual lounge & Comedy Night on Thursday.

The Latest from Cloud Conventions 2021:


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How to Bring the Balance Back to Your Team How to Bring the Balance Back to Your Team

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

May 14, 2021 On Demand Sessions
On Demand Sessions
0 On-Demand-Sessions-On-Demand-Sessions jplist-topic-next-normal jplist-topic-work-life jplist-topic-balance jplist-topic-virtual 05/14/2021 0 508553 508553 Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner Portals?Visit Convey Services »You’ve had to work from home, become the virtual elementary school teacher, try and maintain customer connections, and find a quite space in a crowded home environment. Knowing that 50% of the workforce will continue to remain virtual even when we are fully vaccinated and safe, how do we bring the balance back to our new work/life environment? Join the conversation as we explore strategies that worked in 2020 that we want to adopt in 2021 and beyond.

How to Bring the Balance Back to Your Team

On Demand Sessions

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

Do you have the resilience to navigate the long.. → Do you have the resilience to navigate the long.. →

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

May 13, 2021 On Demand Sessions
On Demand Sessions
1 On-Demand-Sessions-On-Demand-Sessions jplist-topic-next-normal jplist-topic-crisis jplist-topic-2020 05/13/2021 0 508552 508552 Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner Portals?Visit Convey Services » In 2020, we were in crisis and explored strategies to “Weather the Crisis” by developing greater resilience. But we never expected the pandemic to still be going on a year later and people still stuck at home or being afraid of being the one that gets really sick. If your resilience is fading and you’ve struggled to maintain your composure and balance for the long-haul, this is a must-attend session for you. We are moving into the “Next Normal”, so what does that mean for you and your business and how do you maintain the resilience needed for the long-haul?

Do you have the resilience to navigate the long term?

On Demand Sessions

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

Hitting a Moving Target Hitting a Moving Target

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

May 13, 2021 On Demand Sessions
On Demand Sessions
2 On-Demand-Sessions-On-Demand-Sessions jplist-topic-business jplist-topic-new-normal 05/13/2021 0 508734 508734 Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner Portals?Visit Convey Services » Charles Darwin’s “survival of the fittest” theory likely will not stand the test of time.  Session leader, certified counselor and corporate coach Marc Pimsler believes that those who survive will be creative enough to know how to pivot in times of adversity.  Join Marc as he leads a session on how to energize your creativity, become more spontaneous, and become the agent of change you need to be in order to “navigate the next normal”

Hitting a Moving Target

On Demand Sessions

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

Where's the Water Cooler? Where's the Water Cooler?

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

May 13, 2021 On Demand Sessions
On Demand Sessions
3 On-Demand-Sessions-On-Demand-Sessions jplist-topic-team jplist-topic-virtual-meetings jplist-topic-relationships 05/13/2021 0 508551 508551 Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner Portals?Visit Convey Services » We’ve been on hundreds of Zoom®, MS Teams® or BlueJeans® meetings by now, so we know how to “connect”, but do we really know how to stay “connected”. Making connections in the channel has always been about seeing people face to face, going to partner events or connecting in Vegas, so how do we maintain those connections virtually to keep our relationships with customers and peers active and close even if it’s only through a video connection? Join Marc Pimsler as he leads a panel from the channel for this important conversation.

Where's the Water Cooler?

On Demand Sessions

Interested in learning more about Cloud Conventions Virtual Events?Visit Cloud Conventions »Want to learn about Convey Services Partner ...

Jeffrey Pearl Jeffrey Pearl

CEO, OTG Consulting

Click here to request a meeting Jeffrey Pearl runs a Colorado-based master agency, OTG Consulting, a consortium of some of the ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
4 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-OTG jplist-topic-Jeffrey-Pearl 0 509253 509253

Jeffrey Pearl

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meeting Jeffrey Pearl runs a Colorado-based master agency, OTG Consulting, a consortium of some of the industry's most ...

Michelle Cummings Michelle Cummings

Founder, Training Wheels & Personify Leadership

Click here to request a meetingMichelle Cummings, M.SMichelle Cummings, M.S., is the Big Wheel and founder of Training Wheels, a ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
5 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-Michelle-Cummings 0 509662 509662 Click here to request a meetingMichelle Cummings, M.SMichelle Cummings, M.S., is the Big Wheel and founder of Training Wheels, a known leader in the Team building field. She is also the Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer for Personify Leadership, a leadership development course. She is an accomplished author and is a dynamic, sought-after speaker and consultant in the areas of leadership, teambuilding, and experiential learning. Michelle has created a wide variety of facilitation, debriefing and teambuilding activities that have collectively changed the way trainers and educators work.

Michelle Cummings

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meetingMichelle Cummings, M.SMichelle Cummings, M.S., is the Big Wheel and founder of Training Wheels, a known leader ...

Mike Boland Mike Boland

Founder/Partner at TelAdvocate Communications

Click here to request a meeting Since its founding 14 years ago, TelAdvocate has become one of the largest and most respected Telecom ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
6 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-Mike-Boland jplist-topic-TelAdvocate 0 509362 509362 Click here to request a meeting Since its founding 14 years ago, TelAdvocate has become one of the largest and most respected Telecom and Cloud Services distributors in the country. As the industry’s premier Master Agency, we provide cutting edge tools, software, engineering, design, and sales support to thousands of Sales Partners and enterprises across the country. Our unmatched back-office support is staffed by expert telecom and cloud professionals providing high touch, personalized support. We feature a private life-cycle management software allows our Partners to manage their entire business from end-to-end; but it is our people not our portal that distinguishes us.

Mike Boland

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meeting Since its founding 14 years ago, TelAdvocate has become one of the largest and most respected Telecom and Cloud ...

Marc Pinsler Marc Pinsler

Chief Creative Office, MVP Consulting

Click here to request a meetingMarc Pinsler serves as the Chief Creative Officer for MVP Consulting, providing training, counseling, and ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
7 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-Marc-Pinsler jplist-topic-MVP-Consulting 0 508733 508733 Click here to request a meetingMarc Pinsler serves as the Chief Creative Officer for MVP Consulting, providing training, counseling, and consultation to individuals, families and corporations. Marc is certified as a national addictions counselor, is certified as a yoga and meditation teacher, and is also an Advanced Certified Relapse Prevention Specialist. Marc is skilled in using Rapid Resolution Therapy in the treatment of PTSD, Grief, Anxiety, and to eliminate cravings and is passionate about recovery both his own as well as his clients’, believing that sometimes all we need is a helping hand and a fresh perspective. Grounded in the belief system that everyone has the capacity to recover, Marc brings humor and spirituality to everything he is involved in. As a gifted counselor, Marc was recognized as the 2010 GACA (Georgia Addiction Counselors Association) New Counselor of the year.

Marc Pinsler

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meetingMarc Pinsler serves as the Chief Creative Officer for MVP Consulting, providing training, counseling, and ...

Sandy Newes, PhD Sandy Newes, PhD

Licensed Psychologist

Click here to request a meetingDr. Sandra Newes (aka "Sandy") is a Licensed Psychologist operating a private practice in the Asheville, ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
8 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-Psychologist jplist-topic-psychology jplist-topic-neurofeedback 0 508566 508566 Click here to request a meetingDr. Sandra Newes (aka "Sandy") is a Licensed Psychologist operating a private practice in the Asheville, North Carolina area. Dr. Newes specializes in treating trauma, anxiety, chronic stress, self-regulation issues, and adult ADHD and works with older adolescents, young adults, and adult clients. In addition to her therapeutic practice, Dr. Newes is nationally recognized for her work in psychological testing, neurofeedback, outdoor behavioral healthcare, young adult and adolescent treatment program development, program research, and neurofeedback.

Sandy Newes, PhD

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meetingDr. Sandra Newes (aka "Sandy") is a Licensed Psychologist operating a private practice in the Asheville, North ...

Bobbi Beale, PsyD Bobbi Beale, PsyD

Life Adventures for All

Click here to request a meetingBobbi Beale, PsyD, is a Senior Research Associate at the Center for Innovative Practices, part of the ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
9 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-PsyD jplist-topic-Life-Adventures jplist-topic-life-adventures-for-all 0 508523 508523

Bobbi Beale, PsyD

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meetingBobbi Beale, PsyD, is a Senior Research Associate at the Center for Innovative Practices, part of the Begun Center ...

Derek Herider Derek Herider

Director of Account Management WOW Business!

Click here to request a meetingDerek Herider manages the channel for WOW Business! One of the largest broadband providers in the ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
10 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-Derek-Herider jplist-topic-wow- 0 510312 510312 Click here to request a meetingDerek Herider manages the channel for WOW Business! One of the largest broadband providers in the country. He is an expert at transforming business processes and developing innovative strategies to improve employee empowerment. Before his career in the Telecommunications industry Derek served in the US Army which contributed heavily to his beliefs that the team comes first!

Derek Herider

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meetingDerek Herider manages the channel for WOW Business! One of the largest broadband providers in the country. He is an ...

Stephanie Yost Stephanie Yost

Certified Counselor, GumTree LLC

Click here to request a meeting Stephanie (aka Steph) Yost, PCC, CPCC, is a Professional Certified Coach with the ICF, a Certified ...

Speaker Profile
Speaker Profile
11 Speaker-Profile-Speaker-Profile jplist-topic-counselor jplist-topic-gumtree-llc jplist-topic-PCC jplist-topic-CPCC 0 508524 508524 Click here to request a meeting Stephanie (aka Steph) Yost, PCC, CPCC, is a Professional Certified Coach with the ICF, a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach and the CCO (Chief Creative Officer) of GumTree LLC, a coaching and consulting company for individual business leaders navigating personal and professional change. She is also currently an Associate for the London based team of White & Lime Coaching and the Founder of WiNGs, the Women’s Network Group in State College, PA. Stephanie has been partnering with leaders for close to two decades. Currently, Stephanie works with Emerging Women, Inc, facilitating Power Circles for chosen leaders at Hewlett-Packard; is an ongoing Mentor Coach for the Founders in the Techstars Accelerators for both Boulder and Denver, CO, and was most recently the sole Leadership Coach at Gaia, Inc. A Master of Inquiry into what motivates and inspires humans in both the professional and personal realms, Stephanie reconnects leaders with their innate power and passion, bringing freedom and fun to their work, money, health and relationships. Headquartered on the island of Maui, with a portion of her time spent in Boulder, CO, she works with people anywhere in world via phone and video. She especially loves working with those ready to create a revolution, both within themselves and in their communities. She believes that we only improve with age and that radical self-care is the secret to the universe. To support yours or your company's own evolution, drop her a line.

Stephanie Yost

Speaker Profile

Click here to request a meeting Stephanie (aka Steph) Yost, PCC, CPCC, is a Professional Certified Coach with the ICF, a Certified ...

Commercial Real Estate’s Pandemic Pain Is Only.. → Commercial Real Estate’s Pandemic Pain Is Only.. →

December 22, 2020 by Noah Buhayar, John Gittelsohn and Jackie Gu

Bloomberg article written by Noah Buhayar, John Gittelsohn and Jackie Gu. Published December 22, 2020.The coronavirus pandemic shuttered ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
12 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-commercial jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-cre jplist-topic-covid jplist-topic-coronavirus jplist-topic-office jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-rent jplist-topic-trends jplist-topic-lease jplist-topic-markets 0 506406 506406

Commercial Real Estate’s Pandemic Pain Is Only Just Beginning

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Bloomberg article written by Noah Buhayar, John Gittelsohn and Jackie Gu. Published December 22, 2020.The coronavirus pandemic shuttered thousands ...

2020 Allen Matkins View From the Top: Top 10.. → 2020 Allen Matkins View From the Top: Top 10.. →

November 10, 2020 by Anton Natsis

Article written by Anton Natsis and published on November 10, 2020 to the National Law Review.A Rapid but Uneven Market Recovery from ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
13 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-covid jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-trends jplist-topic-commercial jplist-topic-business jplist-topic-office jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-WFH jplist-topic-tech jplist-topic-office-space 0 506213 506213 Article written by Anton Natsis and published on November 10, 2020 to the National Law Review.A Rapid but Uneven Market Recovery from the Pandemic Downturn Michael Van Konynenburg of Eastdil Secured gave another excellent summation of the current economic climate. Though the pandemic has caused widespread market volatility and unemployment, a fast economic recovery has also occurred, in large part due to the federal government’s fast response that has pumped trillions into the failing economy. In fact, the U.S. economy has never before experienced such a precipitous market decline and recovery—it has taken only five months for the market to recover from a 34 percent decline. But the winners in this recovery are not across the board—the likely winners will be logistics, data centers, life science, and innovation markets, while the most challenged markets will be retail (particularly malls), the hospitality industry, and commodity office.2. COVID-19 Will Bring a Widespread Expansion of Office Touchless Technology. While it will take a while for office landlords to coordinate with their tenants to phase employees back to working in-office full-time (in less dense layouts), Kilroy Realty Corporation’s John Kilroy reports that “office technology is now stepping forward in ways it hasn’t in the past to make the touchless environment more expansive.” From automated lighting and elevators to sinks and toilets, Kilroy believes that it won’t be long before an employee will have a chip or keycard on their person that will activate many aspects of their office life when they enter a room, such as turning on the lights, opening and closing blinds, turning on air conditioning, and more. This technology was already in development before the pandemic, but the collective desire to get back into the workplace has made it a high priority for companies and rapidly accelerated its implementation. We can expect offices to look very different in that regard a year from now.3. Employee Office Culture Will Return. Though many were excited about the newfound possibilities of working from home early on in the pandemic, many employers and employees have now come around and found that it is less productive than working in an office environment and doesn’t work as well as they initially thought. Working in an office is “about building culture, building community, onboarding employees, building mentorship and apprenticeship,” says Owen D. Thomas, CEO of Boston Properties. It also wears on employees to have that line between work and home life blurred—“Am I working from home, or living in my office?” Work from home will certainly be a bigger part of the work environment moving forward, but it appears that many companies and employers who went all-in on the work-from-home model early on are now seeing the downside of it and want their employees to return to work. We should expect a hybrid of office and work from home in the future.4. The Office of the Future will Prioritize Collaboration. “We’re really looking closely at how office space may get away from being an area for dedicated workspaces, and how it will morph into more of a living room setting that addresses comradery and connection,” noted Robert Paratte of Kilroy Realty Corporation. As it has become clear that remote working has worked better for “head-down” type work and less well for collaborative and creative projects, we may see offices in the coming months and years be re-imagined as spaces that omit the sea of desks where isolated work is done (such work can stay remote). This will be to make more room for wider, less dense floor plans complemented with extra outdoor spaces that encourage the in-person interaction that is so valuable for creative and collaborative work.5. Global Capital Is Still Looking to Invest in the U.S. If an attractive asset such as life science or logistics goes on the market right now, interested parties are going to be limited domestically and coming primarily from abroad. Both Kevin Shannon of Newmark Knight Frank and Stephen Van Dusen of Eastdil Secured agree that the U.S. is still the safe haven for capital, creating a global appetite for U.S. investment—Korean investment in the U.S. alone has tripled in the past year. Investment interest is coming from Europe (particularly Germany), Asia (particularly Singapore and Korea), and Australia, which are all looking to invest their capital where the economic growth and demand is happening. With cap rates in European cities in the 2.75% to 3.5% range, the yield that’s available domestically is comparatively attractive in conjunction with their hedging costs.6. COVID is Accelerating Technology Trends that were Already Occurring. According to Matthew Field at TMG Partners, “What’s happening with COVID can be seen as ‘the Great Acceleration,’ accelerating things that were already at play before March.” Warehouses and online retailing, personal fitness, and telemedicine were already trending before the pandemic hit, and this technology has just grown more rapidly due to the pandemic. Of course, hotel, travel, and the hospitality industries have taken a huge and devastating hit and will take time to recover, but as a whole, we will see a lot of societal transformation and innovation born out of this rapid technological acceleration.7. Leasing Transactions Continue to be Extremely Slow. Chris Roeder at Jones Lang LaSalle reports that leasing activity has significantly dropped and that everyone is spending their time preparing for when the world is safe enough to bring life back to a state of normalcy. As Rod Diehl at Boston Properties stated, “Until we have a vaccine, I’m afraid that we’re going to be treading water.” A lot of sublease space has also been added to the market over the past few months, and it will be a challenge to fill it all with so many uncertainties about the future still in place.8. Renewals will Dominate the Leasing Market for the Next Year. Our leasing panel agrees that over the next three or four quarters, short-term renewals are going to take up the majority of the office leasing market. Peter Brindley at Paramount Group predicts that as tenants begin to identify and discover how they’re going to re-configure, improve, and use their space in a safe way, they’ll be more inclined to relocate and start to execute on those strategies. At that point, the pendulum should shift away from renewals and back towards leasing as tenants realize they need to move to create safe office spaces for their employees.9. Construction is Generally Moving Forward on Schedule. In discussing the effects of the pandemic on development, permitting, and construction, developers reported that projects that were already in process before the pandemic have moved forward with few delays overall. There have been some challenges in navigating on-site safety measures for contractors, but significant delays in construction have been few and far between.10. Permitting Challenges are Widespread. On the other hand, the permitting process has been significantly more challenging for developers and has led to many delays. Building departments, which are already operating with an antiquated, non-digitized system, are working from home and don’t have the supervision, collaboration, or resources that they would have working in the office, significantly slowing down the permitting process. According to Thomas McCarthy at McCarthy Cook, operating within a regulated environment when the regulators aren’t at the office has been a major challenge: “To get permits and plans approved with the City [of Los Angeles] has been difficult at minimum and at times a nightmare.” Steve Eimer at Related Companies adds that this issue will probably get worse as these permitting departments’ revenue from taxes shrinks due to the pandemic, putting them under further strain.

2020 Allen Matkins View From the Top: Top 10 Commercial Real Estate Trends

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Article written by Anton Natsis and published on November 10, 2020 to the National Law Review.A Rapid but Uneven Market Recovery from the Pandemic ...

Commercial real estate must do more than merely.. → Commercial real estate must do more than merely.. →

April 9, 2020 by Vaibhav Gujral, Robert Palter, Aditya Sanghvi, and Brian ...

Article posted to McKinsey & Company website on April 9, 2020 by Vaibhav Gujral, Robert Palter, Aditya Sanghvi, and Brian ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
14 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-commercial jplist-topic-trends jplist-topic-coronavirus jplist-topic-business jplist-topic-invest jplist-topic-rent jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-office jplist-topic-space 0 506192 506192

Commercial real estate must do more than merely adapt to coronavirus

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Article posted to McKinsey & Company website on April 9, 2020 by Vaibhav Gujral, Robert Palter, Aditya Sanghvi, and Brian Vickery. COVID-19 is ...

Forget Commercial Real Estate Predictions for.. → Forget Commercial Real Estate Predictions for.. →

March 25, 2021 by Eric Hayden

News article retrieved from Forbes.com. March 25, 2021 by Eric Hayden, Forbes Councils MemberA global pandemic, contentious politics and ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
15 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-commercial-real-estate jplist-topic-buy jplist-topic-sell jplist-topic-2021 jplist-topic-predictions jplist-topic-buildings jplist-topic-tenants jplist-topic-rent jplist-topic-remote 0 506185 506185

Forget Commercial Real Estate Predictions for 2021: Let's Talk About 2031Instead

Commercial Real Estate Trends

News article retrieved from Forbes.com. March 25, 2021 by Eric Hayden, Forbes Councils MemberA global pandemic, contentious politics and natural ...

A Commercial Real-Estate Investor Pivots to.. → A Commercial Real-Estate Investor Pivots to.. →

March 24 2021 by Inta Pacheco

Article from the WSJ. Written by Inta Pacheco and published on March 24, 2021.Colony Capital Inc. has made one of the biggest pivots in ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
16 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-commercial jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-trends jplist-topic-assets jplist-topic-invest jplist-topic-building jplist-topic-sell jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-office 0 506132 506132 Article from the WSJ. Written by Inta Pacheco and published on March 24, 2021.Colony Capital Inc. has made one of the biggest pivots in the real-estate business. Over the past two years, the former investor in commercial real estate has sold warehouses, hotels and other traditional properties and plowed the proceeds into data centers, cell towers and fiber-network assets. In short, the company, capitalizing on the continuing revolution in wireless communications, has transformed itself into an owner of digital-related real-estate assets and provider of digital networks—particularly 5G. Chief Executive Marc Ganzi has led this shift, amassing $30 billion in digital-infrastructure assets. His former company, Digital Bridge, merged with Colony Capital in 2019, at which time 80% of Colony’s assets were in traditional real estate, Mr. Ganzi says. Since then, 60% of the merged company’s assets have become data centers, cell towers, fiber networks and small cells, or transmitters that can be placed on structures or buildings to expand the range of wireless signals. Colony will seek to accelerate its move into infrastructure for phone and data services across the U.S. and globally as the rollout of 5G services continues. Autonomous vehicles, farm equipment, public-safety networks and hospitals all will need 5G services, and Colony is placing its infrastructure with these customers and others in mind.

A Commercial Real-Estate Investor Pivots to Digital-Related Assets

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Article from the WSJ. Written by Inta Pacheco and published on March 24, 2021.Colony Capital Inc. has made one of the biggest pivots in the ...

2021 Brings Commercial Real Estate Opportunities 2021 Brings Commercial Real Estate Opportunities

January 6, 2021 by Al Brooks, Head of Commercial Real Estate, Commercial ...

Article from Chase J.P. Morgan website. Written by Al Brooks; published on Jan 06, 2021.The year 2020 was unlike any other, primarily ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
17 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-commercial jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-banking jplist-topic-cities jplist-topic-business jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-investment jplist-topic-rent jplist-topic-default jplist-topic-cost 0 506129 506129

2021 Brings Commercial Real Estate Opportunities

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Article from Chase J.P. Morgan website. Written by Al Brooks; published on Jan 06, 2021.The year 2020 was unlike any other, primarily because of ...

What to expect from commercial real estate in 2021 What to expect from commercial real estate in 2021

December 7, 2020 by Sarah Paynter, Yahoo Finance reporter

Article from December 7, 2020 and written by Megan Paynter, Yahoo Finance reporterIf offices, hotels and other commercial properties ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
18 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-buildings jplist-topic-business jplist-topic-relocate jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-investment jplist-topic-cities jplist-topic-skyline 0 506127 506127

What to expect from commercial real estate in 2021

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Article from December 7, 2020 and written by Megan Paynter, Yahoo Finance reporterIf offices, hotels and other commercial properties survive, ...

Hong Kong Commercial Property Investment Spikes.. → Hong Kong Commercial Property Investment Spikes.. →

April 20, 2021 by Michael Gerrity

Article written by Michael Gerrity on April 20, 2021. Retail, Industrial properties remain key investment focus in Q2 According to new ...

Commercial Real Estate Trends
19 Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends-Commercial-Real-Estate-Trends jplist-topic-real-estate jplist-topic-commercial jplist-topic-property jplist-topic-investment jplist-topic-land jplist-topic-remote jplist-topic-relocate 0 506124 506124 Article written by Michael Gerrity on April 20, 2021. Retail, Industrial properties remain key investment focus in Q2 According to new research by JLL, total investment volumes in Hong Kong for commercial properties worth over HKD 20 million increased 22.6% year-on-year to HKD 12.5 billion in the first quarter of this year as the Covid-19 pandemic began to ease. It reflects the market sentiment in the first quarter improved compared to a year ago. Sales of retail properties were the most active among the commercial properties in the first quarter. Around 57% of the total investment volume of commercial properties worth HKD 100 million or above was attributed to retail properties. The proportion of retail related transactions increased to about 61.2% if you included the sales of commercial properties worth HKD 20 million or above. The total investment volume of retail properties worth HKD 100 million or above grew 15.4% y-o-y. The growth is even more obvious if included the sales of retail properties worth HKD 20 million or above, which grew 33.7% y-o-y. Industrial property was another market focus in the first quarter. More overseas institutional investors engaged in the industrial sector with Goodman Asia purchasing two properties from Samson Paper Company Limited for over HKD 750 million. Silkroad Property Partners also purchased Smile Centre in Fanling for HKD 321 million. In the office investment market, office transaction volume significantly contracted quarter-on-quarter by 89.1%, in terms of transactions worth HKD 100 million or above. The drop was mainly due to the miss of major transactions. Oscar Chan, Head of Capital Markets at JLL in Hong Kong said, "The investment market was driven by the sales of retail properties in the last quarter, in particular the retail properties in non-shopping districts. Investors are interested in buying retail properties as the retail rents have dropped 72% from the market peak to the rental level in the fourth quarter of 2003 and are expected to stabilize. They believe it is probably the right time to buy retail properties as the asking prices have softened and the retail rents are expected to recover." "As the outbreak eases, we have started to see overseas investment funds returning to Hong Kong's property investment market with several industrial properties acquired. Looking ahead, as the city resumes normality along with the ongoing vaccination program, we expect more large-scale transactions in the second quarter. Retail and industrial properties are likely to remain the focus of investors," he added.

Hong Kong Commercial Property Investment Spikes 23 Percent in 2021

Commercial Real Estate Trends

Article written by Michael Gerrity on April 20, 2021. Retail, Industrial properties remain key investment focus in Q2 According to new research by ...

Trends Shaping Corporate Wellness Programs in 2021 Trends Shaping Corporate Wellness Programs in 2021

Published by Linchpin on March 11, 2021

From article: Trends Shaping Corporate Wellness Programs in 2021 published by LinchpinCorporate wellness programs are put in place to ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
20 Corporate-Wellness-Corporate-Wellness jplist-topic-Corporate-Wellness 0 504653 504653

Trends Shaping Corporate Wellness Programs in 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: Trends Shaping Corporate Wellness Programs in 2021 published by LinchpinCorporate wellness programs are put in place to ensure that ...

Employee Wellness Trends For 2021 Employee Wellness Trends For 2021

Published by medikeeper

From article: Employee Wellness Trends For 2021 published by medikeeper In order to be successful, wellness programs have ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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Employee Wellness Trends For 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: Employee Wellness Trends For 2021 published by medikeeper In order to be successful, wellness programs have always had to ...

Top 5 Workplace Wellness Trends for 2021 Top 5 Workplace Wellness Trends for 2021

Published by allwork published by January 13, 2021

From article: Top 5 Workplace Wellness Trends for 2021 published by allwork The COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted employee ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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Top 5 Workplace Wellness Trends for 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: Top 5 Workplace Wellness Trends for 2021 published by allwork The COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted employee perks and ...

Top 8 Workplace Trends to Watch For In 2021 Top 8 Workplace Trends to Watch For In 2021

Published by Human Resources Today published by March 1, 2021

From article: Top 8 Workplace Trends to Watch For In 2021 published by Human Resources TodayWhat a year! 2020 has changed and shaken ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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Top 8 Workplace Trends to Watch For In 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: Top 8 Workplace Trends to Watch For In 2021 published by Human Resources TodayWhat a year! 2020 has changed and shaken up ...

9 Workplace Wellness Trends to Watch Out for in.. → 9 Workplace Wellness Trends to Watch Out for in.. →

Published by Human Resources Today

From article: 9 Workplace Wellness Trends to Watch Out for in 2021 published by Human Resources TodayThe ongoing pandemic is changing ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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9 Workplace Wellness Trends to Watch Out for in 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: 9 Workplace Wellness Trends to Watch Out for in 2021 published by Human Resources TodayThe ongoing pandemic is changing many things ...

HR Trends that will Reshape Work in 2021 HR Trends that will Reshape Work in 2021

Published by Human Resources Today

From article: HR Trends that will Reshape Work in 2021 published by Human Resources TodayThe past year has been quite challenging for HR ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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HR Trends that will Reshape Work in 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: HR Trends that will Reshape Work in 2021 published by Human Resources TodayThe past year has been quite challenging for HR teams. ...

7 Corporate Wellness Trends for 2021 7 Corporate Wellness Trends for 2021

Published by Wellness Workdays on January 13, 2021

From article: 7 Corporate Wellness Trends for 2021 published by Wellness WorkdaysThe past year has certainly brought on new wellness ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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7 Corporate Wellness Trends for 2021

Corporate Wellness

From article: 7 Corporate Wellness Trends for 2021 published by Wellness WorkdaysThe past year has certainly brought on new wellness challenges in ...

How To Launch a Corporate Wellness Program How To Launch a Corporate Wellness Program

Published by Healthie

From article: How To Launch a Corporate Wellness Program published by HealthieHealth issues have been an exceedingly huge concern in the ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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How To Launch a Corporate Wellness Program

Corporate Wellness

From article: How To Launch a Corporate Wellness Program published by HealthieHealth issues have been an exceedingly huge concern in the ...

COVID-19 and Mental Health in the Workplace COVID-19 and Mental Health in the Workplace

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: COVID-19 and Mental Health in the Workplace published by Corporate Wellness MagazineThe coronavirus pandemic has upended ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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COVID-19 and Mental Health in the Workplace

Corporate Wellness

From article: COVID-19 and Mental Health in the Workplace published by Corporate Wellness MagazineThe coronavirus pandemic has upended life as we ...

COVID-19: Who Should Work from Home? COVID-19: Who Should Work from Home?

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: COVID-19: Who Should Work from Home? published by Corporate Wellness MagazineSince the coronavirus outbreak first hit ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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COVID-19: Who Should Work from Home?

Corporate Wellness

From article: COVID-19: Who Should Work from Home? published by Corporate Wellness MagazineSince the coronavirus outbreak first hit early this ...

COVID-19: Is Working from Home Working? COVID-19: Is Working from Home Working?

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: COVID-19: Is Working from Home Working? published by Corporate Wellness Magazine Social distancing measures implemented ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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COVID-19: Is Working from Home Working?

Corporate Wellness

From article: COVID-19: Is Working from Home Working? published by Corporate Wellness Magazine Social distancing measures implemented in the ...

How COVID-19 will Disrupt Corporate Wellness How COVID-19 will Disrupt Corporate Wellness

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: How COVID-19 will Disrupt Corporate Wellness published by Corporate Wellness MagazineThe coronavirus pandemic has affected ...

Corporate Wellness
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How COVID-19 will Disrupt Corporate Wellness

Corporate Wellness

From article: How COVID-19 will Disrupt Corporate Wellness published by Corporate Wellness MagazineThe coronavirus pandemic has affected everyone ...

The Impact of COVID-19 on Employment Law The Impact of COVID-19 on Employment Law

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: The Impact of COVID-19 on Employment Law published by Corporate Wellness MagazineThe coronavirus pandemic shook up the ...

Corporate Wellness
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The Impact of COVID-19 on Employment Law

Corporate Wellness

From article: The Impact of COVID-19 on Employment Law published by Corporate Wellness MagazineThe coronavirus pandemic shook up the corporate ...

Employee Burnout Increasing During the Pandemic Employee Burnout Increasing During the Pandemic

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: Employee Burnout Increasing During the Pandemic published by Corporate Wellness MagazineEmployee burnout has been a ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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Employee Burnout Increasing During the Pandemic

Corporate Wellness

From article: Employee Burnout Increasing During the Pandemic published by Corporate Wellness MagazineEmployee burnout has been a common ...

Employee Engagement Strategies During COVID-19 Employee Engagement Strategies During COVID-19

Published by Corporate Wellness Magazine

From article: Employee Engagement Strategies During COVID-19 published by Corporate Wellness MagazineIt is no longer news that the ...

Corporate Wellness
Corporate Wellness
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Employee Engagement Strategies During COVID-19

Corporate Wellness

From article: Employee Engagement Strategies During COVID-19 published by Corporate Wellness MagazineIt is no longer news that the coronavirus ...

Covid: How to deal with social anxiety as.. → Covid: How to deal with social anxiety as.. →

Published by BBC on April 12, 2021

From article: Covid: How to deal with social anxiety as restrictions ease published by BBC Primark's open, the gym is back and ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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Covid: How to deal with social anxiety as restrictions ease

Return to Work

From article: Covid: How to deal with social anxiety as restrictions ease published by BBC Primark's open, the gym is back and beer ...

After a Year of Remote Life, New Anxiety Emerges:.. → After a Year of Remote Life, New Anxiety Emerges:.. →

Published by wttw on March 11, 2021

From article: After a Year of Remote Life, New Anxiety Emerges: Returning to Work published by wttw One year ago, the World Health ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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After a Year of Remote Life, New Anxiety Emerges: Returning to Work

Return to Work

From article: After a Year of Remote Life, New Anxiety Emerges: Returning to Work published by wttw One year ago, the World Health ...

Dreading going back to the workplace? You might.. → Dreading going back to the workplace? You might.. →

Published by The Conversation on September 10, 2020

From article: Dreading going back to the workplace? You might be feeling separation anxiety from your home published by The ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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Dreading going back to the workplace? You might be feeling separation anxiety from your home

Return to Work

From article: Dreading going back to the workplace? You might be feeling separation anxiety from your home published by The ConversationAs some ...

Back To Office Anxiety? How To Keep Your Fears In.. → Back To Office Anxiety? How To Keep Your Fears In.. →

Published by Forbes on March 16, 2021

From article: Back To Office Anxiety? How To Keep Your Fears In Check published by ForbesReturn-to-office anxiety. It’s a thing. As ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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Back To Office Anxiety? How To Keep Your Fears In Check

Return to Work

From article: Back To Office Anxiety? How To Keep Your Fears In Check published by ForbesReturn-to-office anxiety. It’s a thing. As vaccine ...

Return To Work Anxiety? You’re Not Alone. Return To Work Anxiety? You’re Not Alone.

Published by Forbes on March 16, 2021

From article: Return To Work Anxiety? You’re Not Alone. published by ForbesThere are very few experiences in the world that ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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Return To Work Anxiety? You’re Not Alone.

Return to Work

From article: Return To Work Anxiety? You’re Not Alone. published by ForbesThere are very few experiences in the world that everyone shares. ...

Tips for managing back-to-work anxiety after.. → Tips for managing back-to-work anxiety after.. →

Published by ABC Everyday on January 17, 2021

From article: Tips for managing back-to-work anxiety after working from home through the COVID-19 pandemic published by ABC Everyday The ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
40 Return-to-Work-Return-to-Work jplist-topic-Return-to-Work 0 504384 504384 From article: Tips for managing back-to-work anxiety after working from home through the COVID-19 pandemic published by ABC Everyday The silver lining to 2020's pandemic for many people has been the ability to take a step back from the rat race, stop commuting and work from home. But with the economy whirring back into gear and staff being asked to come back into the workplace, return-to-work anxiety is a very real phenomenon. "It was like starting a new job again and I didn't like that because I really became used to having the autonomy of doing what I had to do on my own, and not having to perform in front of others," says Lucy*, a full-time employee in Adelaide. She had only just started her job in March and had barely met her colleagues when, like tens of thousands of Australians, she was directed to work from home as COVID-19 started spreading across the country. But Lucy found herself enjoying her new working conditions, finding a balance between work and life, and managing to increase her output due to a lack of "open-plan office place distractions". "I was also concerned about catching public transport when we came back, and I wasn't really trusting how well other people returning to the office were practising safe hygiene and doing the right thing by continuously sanitising and things like that," she says. Being fearful is common Beyond Blue lead clinical adviser and GP Grant Blashki says such fears are a "common phenomenon" among his patients."On one hand, people are excited and relieved, but then many have trepidation with a mix of concerns," Dr Blashki says. "Some are fearful about infection, particularly if they are older or have a disability; some have pre-existing social anxiety and have lost their social stamina to interact with people. "But I differentiate between people who have more serious social anxiety issues, and those who have lost their mojo and are getting ready to adjust. "Because for some, there's been that silver lining story, when they've enjoyed the time at home and getting out of the rat race with more time for reflection and families, and now they're having to get back on the train." This includes people like mother and insurance worker Jessica Amorosi, pregnant with her second child, who found working from home gave her back two to three hours each day that she would otherwise spend commuting to the city."It's the work-life balance that I've found most appealing, even if there's a downfall in that you can't go out for Friday night drinks with colleagues after a hard week of work," she says. "But I'm a mother first, so it's easier to be able to pick up my daughter at a reasonable hour, come home and make dinner, and save all that time." She says her own employer is taking a more cautious approach to the pandemic and there had not been any "taps on the shoulder yet" to come back.Anticipation is likely worse than reality Psychiatrist, doctor and Australian Medical Association SA vice president Michelle Atchison says some people may be "very keen to get back into the workplace", while others may feel angry about it. She says COVID pushed "touch points of anxiety" for a lot of people around their work and daily lives, with mental health presentations across the country increasing by about 30 per cent. "People got the message that staying away from crowded places is what we needed to do so we did not get COVID, get very sick or die," Dr Atchison says. "Then they say 'OK, you have to come back to work and be around people', so of course it's something that makes people feel anxious."Tips for dealing with back-to-work anxiety Talk to your employer about whether you can work from home part time. Dr Blashki says an employer may allow you to come back to work gradually, starting, for example, with a half day, if it suits your role.Do a few trial runs and visit the workplace without having to work. "Often the anticipation of what's going to happen is worse than being there," Dr Atchison says. "The more that you put yourself in the situation you're worrying about, the better your body will be."Speak up if your workplace is stressful or colleagues are problematic. "You need to go through the right processes," says Dr Atchison. "With everything else we've been going through at the moment, we don't need people to also be struggling with a difficult workplace."Try not to self-medicate. Alcohol or other substances might help you feel relaxed about the prospect of returning to work "but it does become its own trap", says Dr Atchison.

Tips for managing back-to-work anxiety after working from home through the COVID-19 pandemic

Return to Work

From article: Tips for managing back-to-work anxiety after working from home through the COVID-19 pandemic published by ABC Everyday The silver ...

Returning to work: Prioritizing mental health Returning to work: Prioritizing mental health

Published by Journal of Accountancy on September 11, 2020

From article: Returning to work: Prioritizing mental health published by Journal of AccountancyWith the United States leading the ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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Returning to work: Prioritizing mental health

Return to Work

From article: Returning to work: Prioritizing mental health published by Journal of AccountancyWith the United States leading the world in ...

After A Year Of Working From Home, The COVID.. → After A Year Of Working From Home, The COVID.. →

Published by Bisnow on February 28, 2021

From article: After A Year Of Working From Home, The COVID Office Shakeup Is Just Getting Started published by Bisnow Over the last ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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After A Year Of Working From Home, The COVID Office Shakeup Is Just Getting Started

Return to Work

From article: After A Year Of Working From Home, The COVID Office Shakeup Is Just Getting Started published by Bisnow Over the last year, workers ...

Three approaches to going back to the office.. → Three approaches to going back to the office.. →

Published by Robin

From article: Three approaches to going back to the office after COVID-19 published by RobinThough summer often brings up images of ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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Three approaches to going back to the office after COVID-19

Return to Work

From article: Three approaches to going back to the office after COVID-19 published by RobinThough summer often brings up images of vacation and ...

5 Questions About Returning to the Office 5 Questions About Returning to the Office

Published by pcma on February 3, 2021

From article: 5 Questions About Returning to the Office published by pcma There are workers who can’t wait to go back to go back to ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
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5 Questions About Returning to the Office

Return to Work

From article: 5 Questions About Returning to the Office published by pcma There are workers who can’t wait to go back to go back to the office, ...

COVID-19 impact: Work from home more appealing.. → COVID-19 impact: Work from home more appealing.. →

Published by USA Today on March 25, 2021

From article: COVID-19 impact: Work from home more appealing than return to 'business as usual,' Harvard survey shows published by USA ...

Return to Work
Return to Work
45 Return-to-Work-Return-to-Work jplist-topic-Return-to-Work 0 504367 504367 From article: COVID-19 impact: Work from home more appealing than return to 'business as usual,' Harvard survey shows published by USA TodayDespite potentially longer hours, most Americans enjoy working remotely and want the option to keep doing so after the pandemic, according to a new Harvard Business School Online survey. As COVID-19 forced companies to let employees work remotely and presented new challenges such as readjusting their home life and fighting Zoom fatigue from numerous virtual meetings, most of the 1,500 people surveyed say they excelled and even grew in their professions.  "I think it's a combination of factors, like a Jekyll and Hyde, so to speak," said Patrick Mullane, the school's executive director. "We love working remotely in some ways; it gives us more time to focus, spend time with our families, and no long commutes back and forth to work.  "We found out that we can do a lot without having to be face-to-face as COVID really forced that issue," Mullane said.The survey, released Thursday, comes as many Americans continue to work remotely more than a year after the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic and as more Americans are getting the highly sought COVID-19 vaccinations.But the survey also showed that while most employees miss their colleagues and other aspects of office life, they don't want to go back to "business as usual" because they want more flexibility doing their jobs, Mullane said.  About 81% surveyed say they either don’t want to go back to the office or would prefer a hybrid schedule from now on. Mullane said 27% of employees hope to work remotely full-time, and another 61% would like to work two or three days a week from home. This mindset is going to be tricky for employers, Mullane said. "It’s hard to know how it plays out," Mullane said. "So while everyone is jazzed about remote work, there will be some challenges to work through."Mullane also believes that most employers who adapt to a more flexible work environment may get an advantage over their competition in attracting talent. "It could make some (companies) more successful and profitable in the long run," he said.  About 18% of employees say they want to go back to the office full-time. Those include workers who have kids at home and those who are married, compared with those without children and single, respectively, said Michele Reynolds, who helped direct Harvard's remote worker survey.Reynolds said while 70% of those surveyed have enjoyed spending more time with their loved ones, she added that "some may think there's too much family togetherness" and would welcome being alongside their co-workers. What should the return to the office include?  But those surveyed also said there should be some new workplace conditions. About 51% of employees say they are uncomfortable going back to the office until they’re fully vaccinated, and 71% are hesitant to go back until everyone is fully vaccinated. Also, 54% of employees surveyed expect some form of social distancing in the office, including their colleagues being seated at least 6 feet apart and being required to wear masks. "It begs the question about how employers are going to make their employees feel comfortable in office settings," Mullane said. "I'm sure there are going to be plenty of discussions with employers asking, 'How do I bring them back safely?'"

COVID-19 impact: Work from home more appealing than return to 'business as usual,' Harvard survey shows

Return to Work

From article: COVID-19 impact: Work from home more appealing than return to 'business as usual,' Harvard survey shows published by USA ...

Employee mental health is plummeting one year.. → Employee mental health is plummeting one year.. →

Published by ebn on February 2, 2021

From the article: Employee mental health is plummeting one year into the pandemic published by ebnMental health is at an all ...

Mental Health
Mental Health
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Employee mental health is plummeting one year into the pandemic

Mental Health

From the article: Employee mental health is plummeting one year into the pandemic published by ebnMental health is at an all time low ...

In 2021, Workplace Attention Likely Will Turn to.. → In 2021, Workplace Attention Likely Will Turn to.. →

Published by Concentra on November 25, 2020

From the article: In 2021, Workplace Attention Likely Will Turn to Behavioral Health published by ConcentraTransforming a year ...

Mental Health
Mental Health
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In 2021, Workplace Attention Likely Will Turn to Behavioral Health

Mental Health

From the article: In 2021, Workplace Attention Likely Will Turn to Behavioral Health published by ConcentraTransforming a year of stress ...

COVID-19: Employee Toolkit COVID-19: Employee Toolkit

Published by Astra Zeneca

We are all experiencing unprecedented challenges to personal and working conditions in our own unique way. This toolkit contains practical ...

Resilience Strategies
Resilience Strategies
48 Resilience-Strategies-Resilience-Strategies jplist-topic-resilience 0 504318 504318 We are all experiencing unprecedented challenges to personal and working conditions in our own unique way. This toolkit contains practical resources aimed at maintaining your physical and emotional wellbeing. You will find articles and videos packed with tips on areas such as working from home, dealing with anxiety, building resilience and virtual collaboration.

COVID-19: Employee Toolkit

Resilience Strategies

We are all experiencing unprecedented challenges to personal and working conditions in our own unique way. This toolkit contains practical resources ...

Your 2021 Workplace Mental Health Trends Forecast Your 2021 Workplace Mental Health Trends Forecast

Published by lyra on January 6, 2021

From the article: Your 2021 Workplace Mental Health Trends Forecast published by lyra2020 was marked by ongoing consecutive crises ...

Mental Health
Mental Health
49 Mental-Health-Mental-Health jplist-topic-Mental-Health 0 504306 504306 From the article: Your 2021 Workplace Mental Health Trends Forecast published by lyra2020 was marked by ongoing consecutive crises that have left few people untouched. The coronavirus pandemic has dramatically shifted the way we live, work, and connect with others. Amid unprecedented disruptions, uncertainty, and devastation, the need for workforce mental health support has become more urgent than ever. And while 2021 offers glimmers of hope for a return to quasi-normalcy, there is still an overwhelming need to support employees struggling with anxiety, depression, substance use, loneliness, concerns for their children’s mental health, and rising stress. With that in mind, employers in 2021 are increasingly focused on effective  solutions to address employee mental health. In fact, Lyra’s December survey of 300 human resources and benefits leaders found the following:  86 percent said mental health became a higher priority for their company in 2020.54 percent said their employees now have higher expectations in regards to mental health support from their employers. With awareness and demand for better mental health solutions at an all-time high, what are the best next steps for employers? Based on our recent employer surveys as well as insights from leading benefits and HR professionals, benefits consultants, and mental health clinicians, these are some of the benefit trends we expect to see shape workforce mental health in the year ahead: Greater adoption of comprehensive benefits that address the whole mental health spectrum  When HR and benefits leaders were asked how they believed the mental health care system could be improved within companies, 41 percent said they would choose a “new, comprehensive solution that spans existing services of employee assistance programs (EAPs) and health plans, plus gaps beyond traditional solutions.”  Higher demand for measurement-based care Next-generation mental health solutions will continue to deliver innovative new care models. Using a digital provider network means these solutions can now offer a robust technology platform that not only connects providers with clients, but also tools for measuring symptom improvement. Add to this new approaches to outcome-based provider incentives, and we see significant strides in both access to care and positive outcomes. Plus, measurement-based care not only tends to yield better mental health outcomes for members, but lower overall costs for employers.  More tailored mental health support for underrepresented employee groups.  In 2021, we recommend that people leaders focus more deeply on mental health care and support that addresses the needs of BIPOC employees, as well as other underrepresented employee groups, including LGBTQ+ employees, parents, and other caregivers. Among other things, this will mean ensuring access to culturally responsive mental health care providers who are trained to treat race-based stress and trauma, and seeking benefits vendors with a provider network that reflects companies’ workforce diversity.

Your 2021 Workplace Mental Health Trends Forecast

Mental Health

From the article: Your 2021 Workplace Mental Health Trends Forecast published by lyra2020 was marked by ongoing consecutive crises that have ...

Making the Business Case for Investing in.. → Making the Business Case for Investing in.. →

Published by HR Daily Advisor on March 5, 2021

From the article: Making the Business Case for Investing in Employee Mental Health in 2021 published by HR Daily AdvisorHR executives ...

Mental Health
Mental Health
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Making the Business Case for Investing in Employee Mental Health in 2021

Mental Health

From the article: Making the Business Case for Investing in Employee Mental Health in 2021 published by HR Daily AdvisorHR executives and ...

Employers are increasing support for mental health Employers are increasing support for mental health

Published by American Psychological Association on January 1, 2021

From the article: Employers are increasing support for mental health published by American Psychological AssociationTwo-thirds of ...

Mental Health
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Employers are increasing support for mental health

Mental Health

From the article: Employers are increasing support for mental health published by American Psychological AssociationTwo-thirds of employees report ...

Future Of Work: How Companies Can Continue.. → Future Of Work: How Companies Can Continue.. →

Published by Forbes on March 31, 2021

From the article: Future Of Work: How Companies Can Continue Supporting Employee Mental Health published by ForbesAccording to the ...

Mental Health
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Future Of Work: How Companies Can Continue Supporting Employee Mental Health

Mental Health

From the article: Future Of Work: How Companies Can Continue Supporting Employee Mental Health published by ForbesAccording to the Mental Health ...

COVID-19 and employee mental health: What.. → COVID-19 and employee mental health: What.. →

Published by Thompson Coburn LLP on March 31, 2021

From the article: COVID-19 and employee mental health: What employers can do published by Thompson Coburn LLPThe significant impact of ...

Mental Health
Mental Health
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COVID-19 and employee mental health: What employers can do

Mental Health

From the article: COVID-19 and employee mental health: What employers can do published by Thompson Coburn LLPThe significant impact of COVID-19 on ...

27 Resilience Activities and Worksheets for.. → 27 Resilience Activities and Worksheets for.. →

Published by PositivePsychology on December 2, 2021

From the article: 27 Resilience Activities and Worksheets for Students and Adults published by PositivePsychologyYou may think ...

Resilience Strategies
Resilience Strategies
54 Resilience-Strategies-Resilience-Strategies jplist-topic-resilience 0 504261 504261 From the article: 27 Resilience Activities and Worksheets for Students and Adults published by PositivePsychologyYou may think you’re not very resilient.The word “resilient” might bring to mind all of the struggles and setbacks that have plagued you in your life.You might be thinking about how hard it is to recover from some of the worst ones. You may be thinking, “I’m not resilient at all. Look at how often I’ve struggled to get back up!”If you’re thinking any of these thoughts, then you are probably one of the most resilient people. You have suffered, you have struggled, you have waded through a seemingly unstoppable tide of difficulty – and you have survived."The human capacity for burden is like bamboo – far more flexible than you’d ever believe at first glance."Jodi PicoultWe tend to think of resilient people as those who are unaffected by the challenges of life, or who take a setback with a smile and laugh in the face of their obstacles. But this is not resilience.Resilience is the ability to bounce back, again and again, with every obstacle we face.The person showing little emotional distress in difficulty is not necessarily displaying resilience. The person who fails and feels intense negative emotions, yet tries again the next day, is displaying resilience.Put simply, resilience is the ability to adapt and we can all demonstrate resilience. Granted, some people may be more resilient than others, but it is not an immutable trait or characteristic that you either do or don’t have. Resilience is a learned ability and one that you can build.Resilience is not the absence of distress or difficulty. Resilience is the ability to adapt and grow following adversity.Some of these resilience activities and exercises may help you develop your resilience, while others might make you realize how resilient you already are.Either way, the outcome is more confidence in your ability to bounce back.Read on if you’re ready to learn more about how to boost your resilience and meet challenges with confidence in yourself and your ability to succeed, even after failure.4 Resilience Activities for AdultsWe’ll provide several resources for building resilience, but first, let’s take a look at what the American Psychological Association has to say about building resilience.According to the APA, there are 10 ways to build resilience, many of which will be applied in the training, exercises, and activities listed later:Making connections and building your social support network;Avoiding the tendency to view crises as insurmountable challenges;Accepting that change is a natural and unavoidable part of life;Moving towards your (realistic) goals;Taking decisive actions that will help you face your challenges;Looking for opportunities for self-discovery;Nurturing a positive view of yourself and your abilities;Keeping things in perspective and in context;Maintaining a hopeful outlook on life;And taking care of yourself (APA, “10 Ways”).These ten basic principles of improving resilience can be applied on your own, in a guided therapeutic relationship, or in training and courses on resilience.PositivePsychology.com Realizing Resilience Coaching MasterclassIf you’re a helping professional seeking a comprehensive resource to help your clients build resilience, take a look at our Realizing Resilience Coaching Masterclass.In this course, you’ll gain science-backed tools to show your clients how to navigate life’s ups and downs with poise and resilience, enabling them to improve their overall well-being.The course comprises six modules.1. Positive Psychology 2.0You’ll begin by delving into the darker side of the human experience, often triggered by adverse events. In doing this, you’ll gain the skills to teach and apply positive psychology principles in a holistic and balanced way.2. ResiliencesNext, you will discover the characteristics that make up a resilient person and the four key elements of resilience. The modules that follow explore these four elements in more detail.3. AttentionIn Module 3, you will learn about the first element of resilience–attention. In this module, you’ll develop an understanding of how resilient people direct their attention to positive and negative life events.4. ThoughtsThe second element of resilience you’ll learn about regards thoughts. In this module, you’ll gain a range of practical tools and exercises to help your clients direct their thoughts in constructive ways based on the best scientific practice and theory.5. ActionResilient people are quick to adopt adaptive coping strategies in the face of negative events. Module 5 will teach you to arm your clients with these strategies.6. MotivationWhat drives resilient people to persist and engage in positive coping in the face of adversity? This final module will answer this question and teach you about the last key element of resilience–motivation.The Realizing Resilience Coaching Masterclass© includes a range of useful materials, including live recordings, a workbook for your clients, 19 PowerPoint presentations, and extended usage rights to save you time developing your own materials.Adult Resilience ProgramThis program is intended for teenagers and adults over the age of 16. It is offered online and is especially helpful for older students dealing with stress or pressure from school, family, and upcoming transitions.This program will help participants:Identify their feelings and develop empathy;Control and regulate difficult or intense emotions;Learn relaxation techniques;Practice mindfulness;Prevent bullying, for both bullies and victims;Resist peer pressure and develop positive relationships;Compromise in difficult situations and avoid conflict;Choose appropriate role models;Set realistic and achievable goals;Learn organizational and focus skills;And develop non-internet-based friendships and relationships.This course is delivered through five sessions of 2 to 2.5 hours and guided by a facilitator. Click here to learn more about this training endorsed by the World Health Organization.Samaritans Resilience TrainingThe Samaritan’s organization trains for adults in their “Building Resilience and Wellbeing” course.This course helps participants:Explore the connection between emotional health and resilience, and understand how resilience can positively impact our lives;Assess their own resilience skills;Recognize the indicators of stress and identify sources of support;Learn the Keys of Resilience;Identify practical steps they can take to build resilience;And build a personalized action plan.The course generally takes place over one day and can be delivered at locations throughout the UK.Click here to learn more about this course.Reaching In Reaching Out (RIRO)If you’re a parent, coach, therapist, or mental health professional seeking a more structured approach to helping clients or children build resilience, the Reaching In Reaching Out Resiliency Skills Training program can help.It consists of 12 hours of training divided into two parts:Part 1 helps adults build their own foundation in resilience and learn resiliency skills they can model and encourage in their children. These skills include:Identifying and strengthening resilience abilities.Using strategies to stay calm and focused when experiencing stress.Recognizing how thoughts can affect the ability to cope.Challenging thinking patterns that hinder resilience.Generating alternative ways to deal with conflict and stress.Part 2 teaches participants how to apply these skill to children, through:Modeling the skills and fostering resilience in children.Using their own resiliency skills to help them understand their children’s or clients’ behavior.Incorporating resiliency skills into their work by using child-friendly approaches.This training can be completed in two full days, four half-days, six after-work sessions, or 10-12 brief sessions.To access the RIRO skills training, click here.You can download the printable version of the infographic here.4 Resilience Worksheets for Youth and StudentsThere are many resources out there to help students and youth build resilience, including worksheets that they can work through on their own or with the guidance of a trusted adult. A few of these worksheets are listed below.1. Coloring in for Emotional ClarityThe goal of this worksheet is to help children and students explore their feelings through color.At the same time, it’s a good way to help them gain some insight into the feelings they experience in different situations.To guide students through this worksheet, ask students to recall a recent emotional experience. This could be positive, such as an exciting birthday party, or negative – like an argument with a friend.The instructions are simple: have the students close their eyes and try to reconnect with their feelings during that situation, color in the Mandala in a way that represents how they feel.They can use a variety of colors or just one color, as well as their own choice of materials – however it should best represent their feelings.After they have colored each section in, discuss the color(s) with them. Ask them to reflect on why they chose the color or colors they used, and use questions and active listening to open up more dialogue if you feel it will help.This Coloring in for Emotional Clarity worksheet can help students discover and express their own feelings, as well as help parents or teachers, learn about how the student or child is doing with each area of their life. Before issues can be addressed and learned from, they must first be discussed.2. My Gifts – Traits and TalentsCompleting this exercise can help children and students recognize and appreciate the talents, strengths, and positive traits they have. Encouraging kids to see them as “gifts” adds a fun twist to the whole activity as your child creates a creative “gift box”.To guide you through this exercise, you will need:Gift box template (find this in the worksheet)ScissorsGlueMarkersCraft items to decorate with (such as stickers, sequins, glitter, etc.)Small pieces of paper with different gifts, traits, and strengths written on them.Begin by explaining that this exercise will focus on who you are inside.The first step is identifying the gifts, traits and talents that students feel they have. These include qualities like:ModestConsideratePatientCreativeCalmGentleHelpfulBubblyKindThere is also space at the end of this page to write down a few qualities or characteristics not already listed, so encourage students to be creative if they think some of their “gifts” or good qualities are missing.The second step is for students to share these traits and talents that they chose. Students should describe why they chose each gift or quality and give examples of how these qualities fit them.Step Three is to give students the gift box cutout provided. Have them cut along the dotted lines and arrange the box, then decorate it with their name, their favorite color(s), or any of the craft items they would like to use.Click the link to download My Gifts – Traits and Talents.3. Learning From My WorkThis exercise helps students learn from how they did on a particular assignment or task and learn how to improve in the future.In order to develop resilience, it’s important to be realistic about setting and striving towards goals, learning from one’s mistakes, and trying again.This worksheet presents nine dichotomous pairs of statements with a scale in between. The student should be instructed to indicate on the scale how they feel in regards to these two opposite statements.The statements include:“I did better than I thought I would” vs. “I didn’t do as well as I imagined”“I pushed myself and worked hard” vs. “I could have tried a bit harder”“I took a chance by trying out something new” vs. “I stuck to what I knew, because that’s what I feel sure of.”“I changed my work as I went along” vs. “I stuck to my approach throughout”“I listened to others’ feedback” vs. “I kept going using my own approach”“My work and ideas were my own” vs. “I had help from other sources”“I was clear on the task” vs. “I was unsure what I was supposed to do”“I’m satisfied with my results” vs. “I’m not content with my results”“I was working on a deadline” vs. “It was a continuing project”Use the students’ responses on this Learning From My Work exercise to help them discover where they are satisfied with their work and where they could devote more attention. Encourage them to do better next time, and emphasize that their performance is always a work in progress.If they feel they have failed themselves or their teacher, help them to see that failure is a crucial part of life and not the end of the world when we learn from it.4. What Is Hope?This simple worksheet can help students learn to develop hope and build resiliency. It will guide students through a thought exercise in what hope is, how they tend to think about and experience hope, and how to facilitate greater hope in their lives. This worksheet includes a series of questions to help students explore this topic, including: Aristotle once said: “Hope is a waking dream.” What do you feel this means to you, personally?Have your own hopes changed throughout your life? How?What are three of your biggest aspirations right now?How has being hopeful, or feeling hopeless, influenced choices you’ve made?Has anything happened to you that caused you to lose hope?What kind of things, people, or activities give you hope? Where do you feel your hope, or your hopelessness, comes from in life?In what ways do your surroundings give you more or less hope? How have they given you more or less hope in the past?What kinds of things need to occur for you to feel more hopeful about your life? You can find this worksheet here. 4 Resilience Building Games for Kids in Primary School Primary or elementary school is an excellent time to begin building resilience. Children are so adaptable already that introducing the idea of resilience is much easier than teaching resilience to adults. There are many resources out there for helping build resilience in young children, but games are certainly one of the best ways. Listed below are some of the best games for teaching resilience in primary or elementary school. 1. I Love My ClassmateThis is a great game for helping foster kindness in children. Kindness is important on its own, but learning kindness for others in addition to the self is also vital as a piece of resilience. This game is played with a number of chairs formed into a circle. Make sure there is one less chair than the number of players. The game is played in the following steps: The person standing in the center of the circle begins by saying “I love my classmate, particularly my classmate who…”, completing the sentence with a piece of information that is true for him- or herself. For example, the player could say something like “… particularly my classmate who has a cat” or “… especially my classmate who plays hockey.”As soon as s/he is finished, everyone who this applies to (including the person in the center) moves from their chair to an empty one that is not right next to them.The person who remains in the middle begins a second round of the game. This game will help children get to know each other if they don’t already know each other well, learn about what they have in common with others, and practice kindness towards one another by repeating the phrase “I love my classmate.” Download the instructions for I Love My Classmate. 2. It’s Not a Secret… This game can be played with only several pairs of children and some space. If there is an odd number of children, you can play with them to make an even number. To play, separate students into pairs of two and designate one of them as student A and the other student B. Instruct student A to listen to student B for a specified amount of time, perhaps 15 seconds for very young children or a minute for older children. Instruct student B to finish the sentence “It’s not a secret that…” They can finish this sentence with any information about themselves, whether it’s their family structure, the classes they like best in school, their hobbies, their pets, their favorite or least favorite things or anything else they’d like to share. Student B repeats this sentence several times, completing it with a new piece of information each time. When the time is up, have students A and B switch roles, so A speaks while B listens. This game is another good way for students to get to know each other and to practice active listening. It may even help strike up a few friendships! Having meaningful relationships and practicing kindness is a great way to build resilience. Download the worksheet to read more about It’s Not a Secret. 3. Shuffle Shuffle is played with a four-square court or four markers forming a square with an additional cone in the middle. Review rock-paper-scissors with the children before you begin. The steps of the game are: Five players can play at a time, with each player occupying either a corner or the middle. All other children should be in a line, ready to play when their turn comes.The game begins when the person in the middle says “Shuffle.”At this point, all players must find a new corner or cone to occupy, but no one can go to the center cone.If two players arrive at a corner at the same time, they must play rock-paper-scissors for the corner. The winner stays in the corner, and the loser is “out.”The next person in line becomes the person in the middle and begins the next round. This game helps children learn how to deal with conflict. Meaningful connections are vital to developing resilience, but conflict arises in all relationships at some point. While most conflicts cannot be solved with only “rock-paper-scissors,” this teaches children that conflict can be solved. Although they may be disappointed by being “out” of the game, they will quickly learn that, in life as in the game, their turn will come again. You can read about this game and its other variations at this link: Shuffle. 4. Do The HulaDo The Hula is played in a circle, with all children holding hands. First, demonstrate how to get your body through a hula hoop without using your hands. Make sure that each child has a space in the circle. Then, play the game as follows: Place the hula hoop over two people’s interlocked hands so it cannot escape the circle.Tell the children that the goal of the game is to get the hula hoop all the way around the circle without anyone letting go of their neighbors’ hands.Start the game, and have everyone cheer on the children that are currently trying to move the hula hoop.Once the game has been played for one round, discuss the group’s successes and challenges and try it again. This game is a great way to show children that when conflict or challenges arise, there are ways to deal with them. Even if they face seemingly insurmountable challenges, together they can find a way to overcome them. Variations on this game include challenging the group to beat a chosen time, playing with eyes shut, or dividing the circle into two circles and having them compete against each other. To see more about this game, click Do The Hula. 5 Exercises for Developing Resilience There are many resources for developing resilience in adults aside from courses. For example, there are several exercises that can help build resiliency skills. A few of these exercises are listed below. 1. The Brief Resilience Scale The Brief Resilience Scale is an assessment for understanding your current resilience. While this may not build your resilience directly, it can give you a general overview of your current resiliency skills and abilities. In order to increase your resilience, it’s important to know where you stand. Designed to be compact, the scale itself includes only six questions. Each self-report item is answered on a five-point Likert scale, where 5 indicates “Strongly Agree,” and 1 represents “Strongly Disagree.” Example items include: It does not take me long to recover from a stressful event; andIt is hard for me to snap back when something bad happens. Doing this exercise will help you to recognize where you are in terms of resilience and begin to identify where you can improve from your current state of resilience. 2. Exploring Past Resilience This exercise focuses on your past experiences with resilience. Start by thinking about a time in your life that was particularly challenging or demanding, especially one that was emotionally draining or difficult emotionally. Think about how you handled that situation and eventually came through on the other side. Next, answer some questions to consider the different resilience skills and strategies you applied. For example: What was your objective at the time?What challenges did you need to overcome?What difficult thoughts and emotions do you recall experiencing at the time?What skills were helpful to you in dealing with the situation? What perspectives or mindsets in particular? Going through Exploring Past Resilience and answering these questions will help you to realize the resilience skills you already possess, which can aid you in further building on those skills. Use this exercise to remind yourself that you have already practiced resilience many times before and that you are fully capable of handling whatever comes your way. 3. The Resilience Plan (The 4 S’s) This exercise can help you set goals on improving your resiliency and making sure you keep your resilience-building on track. First, identify a recent experience in which demonstrating resilience helped you overcome adversity. Working through the sheet, you’ll then learn about the 4 S’s of resilience and how they helped you cope at the time: Supportive people – People who gave you advice, or perhaps helped you develop a new, more helpful perspectiveStrategies – Methods and approaches you implemented to deal with difficult thoughts and feelingsSagacity – Wisdom and insights that may have been helpfulSolution-seeking behaviors – Planning, for instance, or searching for useful information. Next, identify a current challenge you’d like to deal with by applying your resilience plan. The exercise will guide you through the steps of crafting a plan, and the worksheet includes examples and templates to get you started. Finally, you’re invited to apply and evaluate your 4-S Plan so that you can continue developing resilience for the future. Resilience is like many other skills or abilities, in that you cannot put forth effort once and consider your learning done. To truly build meaningful resilience, it must be a practice rather than a crash course. Use this goal-setting exercise to facilitate your goal striving. 4. It Could Be Worse… This is an exercise that you can use for yourself or guide your clients through when they are feeling down or excessively worried. “It Could Be Worse” refers to thinking about three ways that their situation could be worse, specifically for yourself or your client). For example, if a friend flaked on your plans, you might feel upset or disappointed, which could lead to feeling abandoned or even to feelings of worthlessness. Instead of focusing on what happened in this situation, think about three ways that it could be worse. For instance, you could think “I could have no friends at all,” “I could have no family members to talk to,” or “I could have nowhere to sleep tonight.” Spend a few minutes truly imagining each scenario. Think about what you would see, hear, and physically feel in each scenario. It may seem counterintuitive to imagine things being worse, but thinking through these three ways can actually remind you of what you already have and instill gratitude for the good things in your life. You can read more about this exercise here: It Could Be Worse. Integrating the Science of Resilience in Schools: 5 Lesson PlansAs mentioned earlier, school is an excellent place to begin building resilience. While parents can and should help their children develop resilience, a classroom setting with their peers and a qualified teacher guiding the way can be an excellent place to learn. A few resources for resilience lesson planning are below. Lesson Plans for Primary/Elementary and Middle School Elementary or primary school is an excellent time to begin teaching resilience to children. The earlier children begin building resilience, the more likely it is to “stick.” However, resilience is not something that can only be built in young children; children in middle school can also benefit greatly from resilience building. The PDF from Lynne Namka and Talk, Trust, and Feel Therapeutics in Tucson, Arizona is an excellent source for lesson plans for young students. To access the PDF click here. It covers teaching a growth mindset, stress inoculation, giving effective praise, helping children deal with emotional trauma, and “bouncing back” after a setback. There are tons of exercises, tools, and lesson plans in this PDF that teachers can use to help young students develop resilience. Another great resource for lesson plans and suggestions for resilience building in young children comes from Professor Helen McGrath’s Bounce Back! program. “Bounce Back!” is an acronym for some of the foundational principles of resilience, specifically: B – Bad times don’t last, and things get better. O – Other people can only help if you share with them. U – Unhelpful thinking only makes you feel worse. N – Nobody is perfect – not you, not your friends, not your family, not anybody! C – Concentrate on the good things in life, no matter how small. E – Everybody suffers, everybody feels pain and experiences setbacks; they are a normal part of life. B – Blame fairly – negative events are often a combination of things you did, things others did, and plain bad luck. A – Accept what you can’t change and try to change what you can. C – Catastrophizing makes things worse – don’t fall prey to believing in the worst interpretation. K – Keep things in perspective. Even the worst moment is but one moment in life. McGrath applies these principles to building these components of resilience: CourageManaging feelingsHumorRelationship skillsSelf-knowledgeGoal setting skillsOptimistic thinkingHelpful thinking skills (avoiding cognitive distortions) You can access a slideshow on the Bounce Back! program here to learn how to apply McGrath’s resilience building principles and activities to each of these areas. Additionally, the PDF from Connect with Kids provides a lesson plan for children in grades 3 to 5 called “Resilient Voices.” It can be found on page 6 and guides students through listing problems they face in their lives, defining resilience, and building a foundation for resilience. To access the PDF click here. Another lesson plan that can help students develop resilience can be found in the previous PDF on page 8 or in the PDF from Connect With Kids and the Drug Abuse Prevention Program in New York. To access the PDF click here. There is great information throughout this PDF, or skip to page 4 to see the Resilient Heroes lesson plan. Lesson Plans for High SchoolWhile it’s best to begin early, high school is still a time that is ripe for building foundational skills like resilience. High school teachers should not be discouraged from incorporating resilience exercises and activities into their lesson plans, as high school students may be one of the groups that need resilience the most! The website reachout.com provides excellent tools and lesson plans for teaching resilience to adolescents. These plans can be incorporated into classes to help high school students deal with difficult situations, including: Illness;Changing schools;Transitioning from primary/elementary to middle school/junior high, middle school to high school, and high school to life beyond;Difficult family situations like divorce;Changes in friendship groups;Conflict with peers;Conflict with family members;And a heavy student workload. The lesson plans you can find here will help students to explore and build seven elements of resilience: Emotional awareness and self-regulationImpulse controlOptimismFlexible and accurate thinkingEmpathySelf-efficacyConnecting and reaching out Exercises and activities are provided for each element, with tips for implementing resilience building and encouraging students along the way. This lesson plan will help students learn about the Seven Resiliencies (insight, independence, relationships, initiative, creativity, humor, and morality) and explore the life of a historical hero, as well as apply the Seven Resiliencies to their own life. If you are a school counselor, therapist or teacher, you would appreciate this excellent resource which will teach you how to teach resilience to others. Aptly named the ‘Realizing Resilience Masterclass©’, the course consists of 6 modules that cover positive psychology, resilience, attention, thoughts, action, and finally motivation. Highly recommended, this online course will enable you to empower others and make an impactful difference in their lives. Bonus: 5 Shame Resilience Theory (SRT) Exercises Aside from the benefits and advantages we know resilience can bring, there is another type of resilience that can greatly enhance the quality of life. The Shame Resilience Theory was developed by author and researcher Brené Brown. Brown noticed that the fear of being vulnerable hindered meaningful connection with others, and one of the many reasons we fear vulnerability is the feeling of shame. Shame is an intense and negative feeling of being hopelessly flawed and unworthy of love and acceptance, and it affects all of us at one point or another, but it can be especially gripping for some people. Shame resilience is a specific kind of resilience to this intensely negative feeling, and building it can do wonderful things for our self-confidence, empathy, and human connection. According to Dr. Brown, there are four elements of shame resilience: Recognizing shame and understanding our shame triggers (physical sensations like elevated heart rate or shaking).Practicing critical awareness, of ourselves and of our environment and the way things work.Reaching out to others and sharing ourselves and our stories (building a social support network).Speaking shame to keep it from flying under the radar (Graham & Graham, 2015). When we recognize shame and understand our triggers, practice critical awareness, share with others, and keep shame out in the open, we lay the groundwork for a type of resilience that will greatly improve our connections with others, our self-esteem, and our overall well-being. There are a few exercises that can be especially helpful for building shame resilience. A few of these are listed below, but many more are out there if you’re interested in learning more. Self-Compassion ExercisesDeveloping self-compassion can be an excellent way to combat shame and build resilience to its effects. Dr. Kristin Neff is the pioneer of self-compassion research, and her website offers several guided meditations and exercises to increase compassion for the self. 1. How Would You Treat a Friend? For example, a simple exercise that can set you on the right path is “How would you treat a friend?” This is a quick and easy exercise that anyone can do. All you need is a piece of paper, a pen, and a willingness to answer honestly. To give this exercise a try, use your paper and pen to answer these questions: First, think about the times when a close friend feels really bad about him or herself or is really struggling in some way. How would you respond to your friend in this situation (especially when you’re at your best)? Please write down what you typically do, what you say, and note the tone in which you typically talk to your friends. Now think about the times when you feel bad about yourself or are struggling. How do you typically respond to yourself in these situations? Please write down what you typically do, what you say, and note the tone in which you talk to yourself. Did you notice a difference? If so, ask yourself why. What factors or fears come into play that leads you to treat yourself and others so differently? Finally, respond to this prompt: Please write down how you think things might change if you responded to yourself in the same way you typically respond to a close friend when you’re suffering. To see this exercise on Dr. Neff’s self-compassion website, click here. 2. Self-Compassion Break To practice the self-compassion break, you must first call to mind a situation in your life that is causing you stress or pain. Think about this situation and how it makes you feel, both emotionally and physically. When you have it in mind and get a handle on the associated feelings, say the following things to yourself: “This is a moment of suffering.” This will activate mindfulness.“Suffering is a part of life.” Saying this helps you realize that you have this in common with all other human beings on the planet – suffering is an unavoidable part of life. You can follow this up by putting your hands over your heart or using whatever soothing self-touch feels right to you.“May I be kind to myself.” Alternatively, you can use other phrases that may apply better in your current situation, such as “May I forgive myself.” or “May I be patient.” Here is the Self-Compassion Break exercise. 3. A Letter of Self-Compassion Writing a self-directed letter can help you express your emotions and, recognize that you are your own most important source of support. It gives you a chance to exercise self-kindness and keep in touch with yourself in a more understanding, forgiving way. All you need to start journaling is paper, a writing instrument, and a willingness to write honestly. At the end of the week, or once a month, take a quiet moment to sit down and practice if you’re hoping to turn your letter-writing into a habit. To help you along, this exercise suggests following a few steps: Think of an aspect of yourself or your life that you often criticize, or dislike. This might be something that you feel self-conscious about, or which makes you feel inadequate. Examples include aspects of your job or your relationship. You’ll write about the feelings this evokes, as well as any thoughts or images that come to mind when you think about it.Next, you’ll write a letter to yourself from the perspective of a good friend or loved one. Rather than writing about your own thoughts on the issue, try to imagine what they would say to you instead. Try to write from a place of genuine understanding, empathy, and unconditional acceptance. What are some of the ways they would show you compassion, support, and care?When you’ve finished, set it aside for 15 minutes. Return to it after this, re-reading what you’ve written and really allowing yourself to absorb what you’ve written. It may not come naturally, but try to open yourself up to the kindness, support, and compassionate feelings throughout the letter. The Letter of Self-Compassion exercise can be found in our Toolkit. 4. Taking Care of the CaregiverThis exercise is intended specifically for those in a healthcare profession or those who take care of a family member. People who spend so much time providing care for others often have a greater need for self-compassion and self-care. The beautiful thing about this exercise is that you can practice it, however works best for you – the only requirement is that you do something for yourself that will meet your needs and help you recharge. This could be getting a massage, taking a long and leisurely walk, going to a yoga class, or spending time relaxing and doing nothing at all. If you just can’t find the time to do any of these in a specific moment of need, practice “on the job” self-care. When you’re feeling overly stressed or overwhelmed in your caregiving, use soothing words or touch, or take a quick self-compassion break. Only you know what will work for you in the moment, but above all, give yourself permission to be human—with all of the flaws and pain that come with being human. To read more about taking care of the caregiver, click here. 5. The Daring Way This isn’t so much an exercise as it is a program, one that requires committing time and energy in order to engage and reap the benefits. The Daring Way is an experiential methodology, facilitated by certified professionals and appropriate for individuals, couples, families, teams, and organizational leaders. The focus of this training is on helping people build shame resiliency skills and become braver, more vulnerable individuals who accept their worthiness and live a fuller, more authentic life. To learn more about The Daring Way, visit thedaringway.com.

27 Resilience Activities and Worksheets for Students and Adults

Resilience Strategies

From the article: 27 Resilience Activities and Worksheets for Students and Adults published by PositivePsychologyYou may think you’re not ...

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From the article: How to Help Employees Improve Their Resilience in The Workplace published by bravo Leading a workforce is no small ...

Resilience Strategies
Resilience Strategies
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How to Help Employees Improve Their Resilience in The Workplace

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From the article: How to Help Employees Improve Their Resilience in The Workplace published by bravo Leading a workforce is no small feat. You ...

Building Resilience: Helping Workers Handle.. → Building Resilience: Helping Workers Handle.. →

Published by SHRM

From the article: Building Resilience: Helping Workers Handle Stress for the Long Haul published by SHRMAthletes often talk about ...

Resilience Strategies
Resilience Strategies
56 Resilience-Strategies-Resilience-Strategies jplist-topic-resilience 0 504258 504258 From the article: Building Resilience: Helping Workers Handle Stress for the Long Haul published by SHRMAthletes often talk about resiliency when they've bounced back from a defeat or a less-than-ideal training day. But resiliency is also sorely needed in the workplace, especially in these times of uncertainty, anxiety and economic worries amid the pandemic. What Is Resiliency? Resiliency isn't quite the same as stress management. Stress management tends to be reactive, the damage control needed when a crisis hits. Resilience is more proactive, teaching people to build ability and skills so they're prepared for the next crisis, and the one after that. As a manager, you can explain to your workers that resilience training means learning how to deal with challenges and setbacks in a different way than they may have learned before. Becoming resilient, experts say, doesn't just help you get through a stressful time, but can also empower you to learn how to stay resilient for the long haul, and in the process experience personal growth and improve your life.  "Typically, resilience is defined as the ability to bounce back, but I think it's more than that," said Brenna Sniderman, executive director of the Center for Integrated Research at Deloitte Services LP in Philadelphia, which focuses on developing fresh perspectives on critical business issues. "It's the ability to … emerge from a crisis in a better position." Sniderman is coauthor of the report, "Bridge across uncertainty," which discusses how crisis leadership with a human focus can support business resilience. "The word I hear most often associated with resilience is empowerment," said Paula Davis-Laack, founder and CEO of the Stress & Resilience Institute, a Milwaukee-based training and consulting firm. "Learning to be resilient puts you back in the driver's seat. You can be taught skills that develop resilience muscles."  While levels of resilience vary from person to person, everyone starts with some, said Dr. Gail Gazelle, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and executive coach for physicians. She wrote Everyday Resilience: A Practical Guide to Build Inner Strength and Weather Life's Challenges (Rockridge Press, 2020) and views resilience as ''a deep well of resources that we all have within us.'' Among the ways to build resilience: Rethink reactions to stress. Urge workers to stop ''catastrophizing" when something negative happens at work, said Davis-Laack, whose forthcoming book is Teaming Up Against Burnout from Wharton School Press. To help workers do that, a manager needs to be more transparent in everyday interactions. For instance, instead of messaging a worker to, "Come see me in my office," try, "Please come by to talk about questions I have on your report." As a manager, you should also aim to be more transparent about the company, its status, its expectations of workers and its future plans, Davis-Laack said. She added that managers can encourage workers to take three steps to reduce catastrophizing about a situation: Write down the worst-case scenario.Write down the best-case scenario.Identify the most likely scenario. Sniderman tells managers: "Make sure your workforce feels comfortable coming to you with questions." That builds feelings of psychological safety, in turn building resilience. That kind of support, she said, ''shouldn't end with the crisis itself," but needs to be ongoing. Encourage connections. Staying connected is crucial for resiliency, and a manager can help foster those connections. Davis-Laack recalled a lawyer who got promoted, then felt her colleagues cooled toward her because she was now "the boss." Then the lawyer's mentor retired, and she felt her support network was gone. "Having people you can reach out to for support is one of the most fundamental cornerstones of resilience," Davis-Laack said. One way managers can foster that connection is to recognize and talk about small wins—not just the annual awards or the goals that took many years—and celebrate those small victories regularly, she added. Simple, brief check-ins with workers during the workday, "showing an interest in who they are versus what they do, is a powerful way to ensure resiliency on a personal and professional level," said Joanne Heyob, senior vice president of operation strategy and design for WD Partners, a strategy, design and architectural firm in Columbus, Ohio. Pay attention to self-care and well-being. It's difficult to feel resilient when you are exhausted, depressed or anxious. Managers should destigmatize the use of well-being programs, including mental health offerings, Sniderman said. Stay in the moment. Learn and practice mindfulness, said Phillis Morgan, founder of Resilient at Work, a consultancy in Alexandria, Va., that helps organizations tackle workplace conflict and stress. Try one of the several mindfulness apps out now. Focus on strengths. Pointing out a worker's strengths and accomplishments builds resiliency. Gazelle said workers at all levels need this—from the physicians she coaches to a shelf stocker at the market. One of Gazelle's doctor clients had a backlog of 350 charts to complete. Gazelle found out that the doctor's manager berated her for the backlog, while dismissing her excellent care for patients. Once the doctor's manager took suggestions from Gazelle and focused on the doctor's strengths—and asked what she could do to help with the charts—the doctor got the resilience she needed to tackle the backlog.

Building Resilience: Helping Workers Handle Stress for the Long Haul

Resilience Strategies

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